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Yes, we’re having a sale. Because we’re renegades, it’s not about Black Friday deals, and we didn’t want to wait till January to cut up to 50% off a selection of titles.

Here they are.

 

Clinical, Brutal 2 – with 40% off

 

Clinical, Brutal 2: Incisive Writing with Guts

http://www.lulu.com/shop/christopher-nosnibor/clinical-brutal-2-incisive-writing-with-guts/paperback/product-21784876.html

 

The 2010 anthology, containing 200 pages of unstinting brutality,also with 40% off

 

Clinical, Brutal... An Anthology of Writing with Guts

http://www.lulu.com/shop/christopher-nosnibor-editor/clinical-brutal-an-anthology-of-writing-with-guts/paperback/product-17814648.html

 

30% off The Bastardizer by Bill Thunder

 

The Bastardizer

http://www.lulu.com/shop/bill-thunder/the-bastardizer/paperback/product-20177080.html

 

This Book is Fucking Stupid – and with 25% off it’s also fucking cheap

 

This Book is Fucking Stupid

http://www.lulu.com/shop/christopher-nosnibor/this-book-is-fucking-stupid/paperback/product-20740563.html

 

Hack by James Wells has 30% off

 

Hack

http://www.lulu.com/shop/james-wells/hack/paperback/product-21951456.html

 

There’s also a whopping 50% off C.N.N., the 2008 collaboration between Christopher Nosnibor and Stuart Bateman

 

C.N.N.

http://www.lulu.com/shop/christopher-nosnibor-and-stuart-bateman/cnn/paperback/product-2998720.html

2012 has been a good year for us here at Clinicality. While we’ve not published quite as many titles as we might have hoped due to financial constraints and having lives outside publishing – including crummy day jobs, yadda yadda – we have put out some titles we’re inordinately proud of. They’ve even been shifting units. We’ve also made pretty much all of our catalogue available for Kindle, and this has proved to be a resounding success. We sold more Kindle titles in the second half of 2012 than print books in the preceding 18 months. It might be sad news in terms of our beloved paper books, but as publishers, our main objective is to get our work out there and get it read. So looking to 2013, we’re aiming to build on the successes of the last 12 months, and naturally, we’ll be keeping it brutal.

While we’re yet to firm up the precise dates, we’ve got our publishing schedule for the first half of 2013 pencilled in and it seems only right to share it. So, provided the Mayan Apocalypse fails to materialise next week, the following titles will be hitting the virtual shelves in the coming months:

February 2013: Karl van Cleave – Incisions, Collisions and Aborted Missions. e-book. A collection of short stories that are both clinical and brutal. ‘Blades’, which will feature in the collection, has already been published as a free e-book through Smashwords, and another taster, ‘Broken Wings’ will be unveiled in the next few weeks.

March 2013: Christopher Nosnibor – This Book is Fucking Stupid. Print edition. The anti-novel that redefines literature by dismantling fiction, criticism, theory and reviewing in under a hundred thousand words, originally published as an e-book in April 2011 finally realises something Kindle can’t.

March 2013: James Wells – Hack. Print edition. Published as an e-book in September 2011, Hack is the ultimate tale of sex ‘n’ drugs ‘n’ rock ‘n’ roll. Sordid, seedy and scuzzy, it’s a must-read, relentless rollercoaster of depravity and musical mayhem.

April 2013: Christopher Nosnibor – The Changing Face of Consumerism. e-book. This collection of essays began life as an occasional series of blogs in 2007. Five years on, the series has run to 13 pieces dissecting changes in capitalist culture based primarily around the publishing and music industries. Those articles are all gathered here, along with a number of previously unpublished discussions on the art world and more.

May 2013: Karl van Cleave – Incisions, Collisions and Aborted Missions. Print edition. Expanded with additional material not in the e-book, including the story ‘Listen’.

Keep watching this space for updates… and meanwhile, thanks to all those who have supported us this year (and during the years since we started up), either by reading the blog/zine or buying our books. We really do appreciate it.

Just because we’ve not posted any new fiction or news on here recently doesn’t mean there’s nothing happening at Clinicality Press. We’ve got a few things in the pipeline for 2013, including a first print edition of Christopher Nosnibor’s latest novel, This Book is Fucking Stupid, and other which we’ll announce in due course.

Meanwhile, being clinical, brutal and cutting edge, we’re considering new avenues for getting Clinicality out there. Because we think we’re pretty rock ‘n’ roll and espouse the punk ethos in a publishing context, and some of our covers are a groove sensation, we thought, hey, why not Clinicality T-shirts?

So far, we’ve come up with a Clinical, Brutal design based on our ethos-defining anthology and a This Book is Fucking Stupid themed design.

 

Clinical Shirt

Clinical… Brutal

 

ThisT-Shirt

 

This T-Shirt is Fucking Stupid

 

So, who wants one?

In recent years, those playfully perverse people behind the increasingly respected and influential Paraphilia Magazine have published a number of far-out paperbacks, while Clinicality Press have carved their own brutal niche in the literary world, producing signature anthologies

In recent years, those playfully perverse people behind the increasingly respected and influential Paraphilia Magazine have published a number of far-out paperbacks, while Clinicality Press have carved their own brutal niche in the literary world, producing signature anthologies A Dream of Stone and Clinical, Brutal… An Anthology of Writing with Guts, as well as a number of single-author titles.

From a warped tale of a deranged serial-killer on a rampage of sexual atrocity across a Europe falling apart in the wake of an unspecified global crisis to intense and corrosive uzi-bursts of poetic anti-narrative from some alternative cyberporn universe intersecting ours, and a posthuman ghost anthology, Paraphilia Books specialise in works of extraordinary imagination and deliciously audacious writing.

Clinicality Press have never shied away from putting the unspeakable into print. From the deranged technicality of the splatter-pulp of The Bastardizer by Bill Thunder to the ultimate sex ‘n’ drugs ‘n’ rock ‘n’ roll romp of James Wells’ Hack, they’re all about pushing boundaries and buttons while raising two fingers to decency.

These two radical publishers of cutting-edge fiction and beyond are now now proud to announce that they’ve joined forces to create a twin-headed publishing beast.

To mark the launch of this new venture, the two publishers have made a slew of exciting titles available on Amazon Kindle for the first time. While Clinicality have slammed down a special expanded second edition of Christopher Nosnibor’s all-encompassing anti-novel This Book is Fucking Stupid, Paraphilia Books have gone all out with their first foray into ebooks making an explosive start with no fewer than six digital titles.

New titles published jointly and on the existing separate imprints are already in the pipeline. The future of literature just got brighter.

The following titles are available to download now in all Amazon territories:

The Membranous Lounge by Hank Kirton

A Dream of Stone (and Other Ghost Stories), edited by D M Mitchell and Dire McCain

Parasite One: Parasite Lost by D M Mitchell

Messages to Central Control by A D Hitchin

The Seventh Song of Maldoror by D M Mitchell

Twilight Furniture

For the full Paraphilia / Clinicality catalogue, go to http://www.paraphiliamagazine.com/books.html

 

 

September was a busy month: James Well’s novel Hack was simultaneously published via Smashwords and as an Amazon Kindle edition, which is available for £2.88 from the .co.uk site, $4.48 in the US, and roughly equivalent prices in different currencies across the other Global Amazon sites. Free samples are available, with the most comprehensive – the first 15% – and in a range of formats being available from Smashwords.
Christopher Nosnibor conducted an in-depth interview with James, which can be found on his blog.

Hack 4 copy

 

We’ve also just launched Kindle editions of Clinical, Brutal… An Anthology of Writing With Guts and Bill Thunder’s brutally hard-boiled detective novel, The Bastardizer. These now join Christopher Nosnibor’s furiously experimental anti-novel THE PLAGIARIST, and further titles will be added shortly.

Finally, we’re always on the lookout for new material for our Blog/zine. If you think you have a piece of poetry or prose with enough punch to knock out a frenzied lion, get in touch via the website.

Short Term Effect

Johnny Webster

 

I was exhausted but equally buoyant after a successful presentation in Glasgow. It had been a long day – I had barely slept the night before and had been convinced that I hadn’t slept at all until I recalled dreams that had drifted through during the hours I had spent turning first one way and then the other in such a regular fashion that had I been a sausage I would have been cooked to an all-round even perfection, basted endlessly in my own sweat as it flooded uncontrollably from me to such an extent that I had decided that on my return home I would book an appointment with my GP with a view to tackling my anxiety. Anxiety in itself was nothing new to me, but the copious perspiration at the slightest sign of anything so much as resembling a stressful situation, or even one that required the smallest degree of energy and focus was a recent development and cause for concern.

Between the presentation and my train there had been time for a bite to eat and a couple of well-earned pints. I had consumed nothing but coffee and water – both in large quantities in an attempt to remain alert despite the sleep deprivation, which had left me feeling detached and strangely wired rather than tired, although I knew that wouldn’t last, and to rehydrate myself after the night’s sweat-fest. This was only proving partially successful, however: despite feeling relatively relaxed – I was well-prepared, after all – the water I was imbibing seemed to be flowing straight back out through my pores. Rather than taking the fluids into my system, I felt as though my skin had the retentive properties of a sieve, or perhaps a muslin straining bag used for making wine and preserves.

By the time I boarded my train, the adrenaline production, and consequently the flow of perspiration, had abated. I was tired, but yet still strangely alert. Too tired and disconnected to feel true elation, I felt like I was watching someone else in my shoes walk down the carriage to my reserved seat. Coach D, seat 38, aisle. Forward-facing, at least, even if the window seat was already occupied, meaning that I couldn’t spread out and truly unwind.

The occupant of seat 37 was a girl, blonde, slim, immersed in a crisp-looking copy of Mini Shopaholic by Sophie Kinsella. Seated directly beside her, I was unable to really take in any other details about her and I certainly wasn’t about to strike up a conversation. You can call me a book snob if you like but chick-lit is, to my mind, the lowest of the low. Burying myself in Tom McCarthy’s C, which I was 175 pages into, I would occasionally glance with my peripheral vision to build the image of my immediate surroundings, something I invariably do, partly to locate myself in time and space and partly because I’m just plain nosey.

She’s on page 45 and is wearing dark blue-grey leggins. The sky is flecked with purple hues as the sun begins to set, illuminating the light, high clouds that scar the flat, pale blue plains like bruises spreading across skin after contact with a hard, heavy object; a baseball bat, a piece of scaffold, perhaps.

I can’t make out her face without being obvious so settle back into the measured narrative of the novel in my hands, which is a large-format first edition paperback copy. I much prefer smaller, pocket-size volumes because I can cram them into my jacket pocket while travelling, but can see to my right that she has small, neat breasts, covered by a copper-coloured cardigan which she is wearing over a white blouse that comes mid-way down her lean thighs. In the window, I can’t see her because my own reflection obstructs my line of vision, but I can see the busty bird in the seat in front of me in her low-cut white vest top and mint-green cardigan as she taps out a text on her smart phone.

I’ve seen all I’m going to from this vantage point, so I return all of my attention to my book, and bung my earphones into my lugs, using the strains of The Stooges’ Funhouse to mask the sound of the conversations of my fellow passengers. The hum of chatter is distracting, but not nearly as bad as snippets of overheard dialogue that offer openings into full-on eavesdrop situations.

My bladder’s beginning to transmit messages to my brain that it needs to be emptied. Electrical impulses course through my body’s information channels and I stumble down the lurching carriage to the toilet and relieve myself with a lengthy and deeply satisfying piss that expels not only a large quantity of the coffee, water and beer but also much of the surplus adrenaline that’s gone past its expiry and beyond its usefulness.

Returning to my seat, I’m better able to clock the girl in seat 37. It’s difficult to determine her age: she could be anywhere between 24 and 36. She’s tanned and had fine lines and despite being age-fixated, I’m hopeless at pinning an age on people. She’s perhaps not as pretty as I might have imagined, or maybe hoped, but not bad-looking by any means. I resume my seat, pick up my book and continue reading.

She’s travelling from Glasgow to Morpeth: I know this because her tickets are face-up on the pull-down ledge that’s hinged onto the back of the seat in front. I wonder if she’ll have to change at Newcastle.

Before long, she begins to gather her belongings and she asks me to excuse her. I stand up and step aside and she brushes past me. She is conspicuous by her lack of scent, or perhaps my own stale sweat smell is drowning it out. She smiles and thanks me, and I fleetingly wonder if she’s perhaps quite attractive after all. Realising that I will never be in a position to resolve this internal debate, I sit down again and pick up my book and the train pulls into Morpeth, an unusual stop on this route.

The stop seems uncommonly long for a small station, and, on realising this, I glance up and lean to my left a little to look down the train. I always do this, although there’s nothing to be achieved in doing so. And then I see her. Her long, blonde locks flow radiantly as she rushes down the aisle of the next carriage ahead and I feel a small tingle of excitement. It seems all too strange and for an instant I wonder if I’ve actually nodded off and am dreaming once more. But no, the door at the end of the carriage opens and she races directly toward me. There’s a minute flutter inside and she arrives beside me. She gives me an embarrassed grimace as she reaches up and tugs her coat from the overhead rack.

‘You got lucky there,’ I say.

Her smile is mixed with relief as she pants a wordless response and then is gone.

Seconds later, the doors close and the train draws away.

With just over a week left in the Clinicality Press January sale, we’ve made some further reductions to our titles.

There’s now 30% off The Bastardizer by Bill Thunder, which means it’s only £5.25.

What the critics have said:

‘…recommended [for] readers who like their tales short and violent, and their heroes as brutal as their villains.’ – Nicholas Towasser, Library Thing.

‘Thunder’s debut at once reinvigorates and exhausts the well-worn detective / crime fiction genre, presenting a classic pulp first-person narrative with a contemporary and deeply misanthropic twist.’ – Christopher Nosnibor

‘…a good change of pace from the normal genre of books.’ – Goodreads.com

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Plus, our genre-smashing collection of poetry and prose Clinical Brutal… An Anthology of Writing With Guts has a whopping 40% off, making it just £4.79! Features: Pablo Vision / Kestra Faye / Jim Lopez / Radcliff Gregory / Díre McCain / Stewart Home / A.D. Hitchin / Christopher Nosnibor / Richard Kovitch / Lee Kwo / S. F. Grimm / David Mark Dannov / D M Mitchell / Jock Drummond / Lucius Rofocale / Stuart Bateman / Karl van Cleave / Vincent Clasper / Constance Stadler / Bill Thunder / Christopher Bateman / Simon Phillips / Maria Gornell

What the critics have said:

‘These are works driven by a raw edginess arising from a world of violence and fragmentation that the authors are seemingly trying to comprehend… at its best this clinical, brutal writing can in many instances be cynical, beautiful writing.’ – Christopher Willard, Bookpleasures.com

‘… a nauseating and very surreal collection of short stories and poems that captured my attention from the front cover, to the very last page… Reading the whole book in one sitting is overwhelming and really messes with your head.’ – Victoria Gonzales, ReaderViews

‘An interesting… experiment in forcing its reader to confront the “beast within”.’ – Lavanya Karthick, Bookpleasures.com

 

Finally, we’ve knocked 10% off Christopher Nosnibor’s dual-narrative brain-bender From Destinations Set, which is now available for just £9.00. It’s also available to download for FREE.

Destinations Cover copy

 

To order all of these and more, go to Clinicality Press’ shop: http://clinicalitypress.co.uk/Publications.aspx – But hurry, the sale ends on January 31st!